Introduction
SECTION - Causes and Characteristics of Cancer - Part 1
INTRODUCTION TO TREATMENTS
Causes and Characteristics of Cancer - Part 2
CHELATION
Hydrogen Medicine
Magnesium Medicine
Bicarbonate Medicine
Iodine Medicine
SELENIUM MEDICINE
Diets, Fasting and Super-Nutrition
CO2, Cancer and Breathing
Oxygen Therapy for Cancer Patients
Cannabis Medicine
Final Considerations

Lesson 67 – What Type of Selenium Should be Used?

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Data suggests that a diet rich in selenium protects against cancers of the stomach, breast, esophagus, lung, prostate, colon, and rectum. According to Dr. Harold Foster death rates in the USA for cancer are lower when blood selenium levels are high. One important study found that high blood levels of selenium is associated with a four- to fivefold decrease in the risk of prostate cancer. Scientists at Stanford University studied 52 men who had prostate cancer and compared them to 96 men who didn’t.[1] One surprising finding was that blood levels of selenium generally decreased with age. It is well known that the risk of prostate cancer increases dramatically as one ages.

Those who have studied geographical differences have seen that in low-selenium regions, higher death rates occurred from malignant lymphomas and cancers of the tongue, esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, liver, pancreas, larynx, lung, kidneys and bladder. In addition, cancer patients with low selenium levels tend to have a wider spread of the disease, more recurrences and die sooner.[2]

In China, where the selenium levels in the soils varies much more dramatically than in the United States, where the population is less mobile, an ecological study in 1985 showed dramatic results in linking cancer with selenium deficiencies. Dr. Shu-Yu Yu measured the selenium content of blood stored in blood banks in 30 different regions in China, and classified the regions as high selenium, medium selenium, and low selenium. They then compared death rates from cancer to the selenium rates and found there was an exact correlation. In the low selenium classification, three times as many people died from cancer as in the high selenium classification.

The West African country of Senegal is dominated by high concentrations of selenium in the soil and thus in their foods, and as expected, we find that Senegalese males had the world’s lowest rates for cancer of the trachea, bronchus and lung; stomach and colon; the fourth lowest for prostate cancer and sixth lowest for esophageal cancer. Senegalese women had the lowest incidence of cancers of the trachea, bronchus, lung, esophagus, stomach and colon and second lowest for breast cancer and fifth lowest for cancer of the uterus.

There is no doubt that selenium is essential for human health and protects against cancer and other diseases. Selenium, especially when used in conjunction with iodine, vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene, works to block chemical reactions that create free radicals in the body (which can damage DNA and cause degenerative change in cells, leading to cancer). Selenium also binds strongly with mercury protecting us from its damaging effects.

Selenium helps stop damaged DNA molecules from reproducing, meaning it acts to prevent tumors from developing. “It contributes towards the death of cancerous and pre-cancer cells. Their death appears to occur before they replicate, thus helping stop cancer before it gets started,” says Dr. James Howenstine in A Physician’s Guide to Natural Health Products That Work.

A 1996 study by Dr. Larry Clark of the University of Arizona showed just how effective selenium can be in protecting against cancer. In the study of 1,300 older people, the occurrence of cancer among those who took 200 micrograms of selenium daily for about seven years was reduced by 42 percent compared to those given a placebo.

Cancer deaths for those taking the selenium were cut almost in half, according to the study that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on December 25, 1996. In addition, the people who had taken selenium had 63 percent fewer prostate cancers, 58 percent fewer colorectal cancers, 46 percent fewer lung cancers and overall 37% fewer cancers. Selenium was found to reduce the risk of lung cancer to a greater degree than stopping smoking.[3]

[1] The Journal of Urology {2001;166:2034-8}. December issue.

[2] Foster HD. "Landscapes of Longevity: The Calcium-Selenium-Mercury Connection in Cancer and Heart Disease," Medical Hypothesis, Vol. 48, pp 361-366, 1997.  

[3] Clark LC. The epidemiology of selenium and cancer. Fed Proc 1985; 44:2584-2590.

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