Causes and Characteristics of Cancer - Part 2
CHELATION
Hydrogen Medicine
2 of 5
0% Complete
0/471 Steps

Diabetes, Chemical, Heavy Metal and Radioactive Poisoning

Few in the world of medicine see that diabetes actually results from poisoning. In volume 18 of Clinical Toxicology in 1981[1] there was a write up about cases of suicide attempts using rat poisoning where all four cases showed hyperglycemia and ketosis. The authors concluded that ingestion of rodenticide can cause diabetes mellitus after they noticed that the onset of diabetes mellitus varied within a very short period of time after swallowing of the poison – only 4 to 7 days.

Medical science avoids telling doctors how sensitive the insulin receptor sites are to chemical poisoning. Patients treated with the atypical anti-psychotic agents clozapine and olanzapine are showing increased risk for insulin resistance according to a study published in the January 2005 issue of The Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.[2] The American Diabetes Association made an announcement warning people to be careful to watch for signs they are developing diabetes, obesity or high cholesterol if they are taking Abilify, Clozaril, Geodon, Risperdal, Seroquel or Zyprexa.[3]

Below we offer demographic maps of diabetes prevalence by state and then compare with maps of mercury concentrations.

This series of US maps shows the Percentage of Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes

Source: CDC, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

The first thing one should notice about these charts is that there is no significant difference in diet and exercise patterns from state to state to explain the different rates of diabetes we see in the CDC map. What the maps below suggest is massive poisoning with mercury is influencing much of the in diabetic epidemic.

a

a

[1] Gallanosa, AG, Spyker DA, Curnow, RT. Clinical Toxicology, Vol 18. No.4, pages 441-449, 20 references, 1981 Diabetes Mellitus Associated with Autonomic and Peripheral Neuropathy After Vacor Rodenticide Poisoning: A review

[2] Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005; 62: 19 – 28.

[3] Journal Diabetes Care. February 2004